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Full text of "Denslow's Mother Goose : being the old familiar rhymes and jingles of Mother Goose"

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EX LIBRIS 















Denslows 

>V>THER 

G°°SE. 

Being the old 
familiar rhym¬ 
es and Jing* - 
les oP MOTH¬ 
ER GOOSE 
edited and ill¬ 
ustrated by 
W. W. D ensl o\7. 

1901 1 * * 

McClure, Phil¬ 
lips &Compaijy 
Publishers f 
NEW YORK 














|7]his book is dedicated to 
I_]Ann Waters Denslo\/ 
with much love arvd grat¬ 
itude fbr her help irv its 
ixvakirvd 












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1 


1 



























































ss Mary, quite contrary 
How does your garden grow? 
With cockle'sh 


in 


a 


row 



























Bye, baby bunting, 
D ad dy s 
gone a 
hunting. 
He ’ll never get 
this rabbits 
skin. 


To wra'p* 




i the 



*32 





-A .. 










[ 


Little Jack Horner 
Satin the corner. 










































Old King Cole 
Was a merry old soul. 

And a merry old soul was he; 

He called for his pipe. 

And he called for his bowl. 
And he called for his fiddlers three. 

Every fiddler, he had a fiddle. 

And a very fine fiddle had he; 
Twee tweedle dee, tweedle dee, 

went the fiddlers. 

Oh, there s none so rare. 

As can compare 

With King Cole and his fiddlers three 














Baa, baa. 

black sheep, 

Have you 

any wool? 

Yes, marry, have I, 

Three bags full; 

One for my master. 

And one for my dame. 

And one 
for the 
little boy 
Who 
lives 
in the 
lane. 









£ 









t "a "cake. 



pat'a" cake, 
baker’s man! 


So I will, master, as fast 

as I can: 

Pat it, and prick it, and 

mark i 
Put in the 
oven for 
Tommy and 

me. 































I 















Great A,little a. 



Bouncing B! 
The cat’s in 
the cup¬ 
board. 
And she 


can’t see. 


















To market, to market, to 

buy a fat pig, 
Home again, home again, 
dancing a jig; 

Ride to market to 
buy a fat hog. 


Home again, home 
again, jiggety- 






















































I love little Pussy, her 
coat is so warm. 
And if I don't hurt her, 
she’ll do me no harm. 
I’ll sit by the fire, and give 
her some food. 

And Pussy will love me, 
because I am good. 










7 









a. M 






m 




m 










—- 















' 


7~*r 





Higgle py. 


She la 


PSggTeby, 
black hen. 


Someti: 

And s 
Higglepy, 


lemen; 
nine, 

|mes ten, 
leby, 
ackhen! 












-me* 





































Hickery; dickety, 
dock. 

The mouse ran 
up the clock; 
The clock 
struck one, 
D own the 
mouse ran, 
Hickety, dickety; 
dock. 
















>ye, baby, on 
! tree top, 

Le wind blows 
cradle will rock; 
e bough bends 
Lever can fall, 
e baby, bough, 
die and all. 



























There was an old woman 
who lived in a shoe. 
She had so many children she 
didn’t know what to do; 
She gave them some broth 
with plenty of bread. 
She kissed them all fondly 
and sent them to bed. 










Poor old Robinson Crusoe! 
Poor old Robinson Crusoe! 
They made him a coat 
Of an old nanny "goat 
I wonder how they 

could do so! 
With a ring _ a"ting tang, 
And a ring-a-ting tang. 
Poor old Robinson Crusoe! 



<Ly&\ 











~Foor^ Old 

i n sor% 
C r L<SO 















R ain, 




way; 


/ 


ome again anothe 

“ ' / , / ' 

/ day; 







Little Ar 



wants to 
play 





A 



















The rose is red. 

The violet’s blu 
Sugar is sweet. 
And so are you.. 






4 





























There was an old 'woman 
tossed up in a basket 
Nineteen times as high as 


the moon; 

Where she was going 1 could' 
n’t but ask it. 

For in her hand she car" 


ried a broom. 

Old woman, old woman, 

old worn an, quoth I, 




O whither, 

O whither, O 
whither so high? 

To brush the cob¬ 
webs off the sky! 

Shall I go with 
thee? Aye* by- 
and bye. 































bury-cross 
To see an old lady upon 
a white horse, 

Rings on her fingers, and 
bells on her toes. 
And so she makes music 
wherever she goes. 



> 



msm 








The Queen of Hearts, she 

made some tarts. 
All on a summer’s day; 
The Knave of Hearts, he 

stole the tarts. 


















The King of Hearts called 

for the tarts. 

And beat the Knave full sore; 
The Knave of Hearts brought 

back the tarts. 

And vowed he’d steal no more. 








Little Bo'peep has lost 

her sheep. 

And can’t tell where 
to find them; 

Leave them alone, and 

they’ll come home. 
And bring their tails 
behind them. 






















































































There was an old woman, 
and what do you think? 
She lived upon nothing 
but victuals and drink: 
Victuals and drink were 


the chief of her diet; 
And yet this old woman 




















Simple Simon 
met a pie- 



Going to the 
fair; 

Says Simple 
Simon to 
the pieman, 

“Let me taste your ware 

S ays the pieman to Simple 
Simon, 

“Show me first your penny 
Says Simple Simon to the 
pieman, 

“Indeed I have not any” 

Simple Simon went a'fishin 
For to catch a whale: 

All the water he had go 
AVas in his mother’s pa 





















% 


Little Miss MufFet, 

She sat on a tufFet, 
Eating of curds and whey; 
There came a great spider. 
Who sat down beside her. 

And frightened Miss 

MufFet away 



i 



















Little 



What shall 


Tom 
Tucker 
S irtgs 
for 
his 

supper, 
he eat? 


White bread 

and butter. 



















Mary had 


ileece 
was white 
asi snow; 
And eve¬ 
rywhere 
that Mary went. 
The lamb was sure 
to go. 


He followed her to school 

one day; 

That was against the rule; 
It made the children laugh 

and play 

To see a lamb at school. 















* 



But still he lingered near. 

And waited patiently about 
Till Mary did appear. 

“What makes the lamb 

love Mary so?” 

The eager children cry. 

“Oh,Mary loves the lamb,you know;’ 
The teacher did reply. 


I 

i 

' 




i 























p 



A diller, 
a dollar, 
A ten o’ 
clo ck 
scholar. 


What makes you come 

so soon? 

You used to come at ten 

o’clock. 


But now you come at noon 




























I had a little 
And it was 
Its head was made 
Its tail was made of 





I sold it to an| old 

woman 
For a copper 
groat; 

And M not 
sing my 
song again 
Without a 
new coat. 















Peter, Peter, 
p umpkin ' e a t e r, 

Had a wife, and 
couldn’t keep her; 

He put her in a 
pumpkin-shell. 



And there he 

















JJ ack and J ill went i xp 

the hill. 

To fetch a pail of water; 
Jack fell down, and broke 

his crown. 
And Jill came turn - 











-- 













Came down too 
soon. 

To inquire his 

way to Norwich. 

He went by the 
south. 

And burnt his 
mouth 

With eating cold 

r»pa«p nnrrifl tfp. 




__ 
































Hey! diddle, diddle. 

The cat and the fiddle. 
The cow jumped over 

the moon; 

The little dog laughed 
to see such sport. 

And the dish ran 
after the spoon. 








































































There was a fat 


man of Bombay, 


Who was smok' 




ing one sunshiny day. 


When a bird called a 


snipe 




pipe 


vexed the fat man 


of Bombay, 































Hark, hark! 

The dogs do hark, 

- r '~' k ~’ 

Beggars are coming to town; 
Some in tags. 

Some in rags. 

And some in velvet gowns. 



4 
























Tack be 
nimble, 
a c k be 
q uick. 


And Jack 


jump over 
the 


candle stick. 

















Three wise men of Gotham 
Went to sea in a bowl* 
And if the bowl had 

been stronger, 

"I 

TTy song would have 
been longer. 


























Deedle, deedle, dumpling, 

my 5 on John 
Went to bed with, his 



trousers on; 

One shoe off, the other 

shoe on, 
Deedle, dee~ 
die, dumpling, 
my son 
1 ohn. 
















Cock a doodle doo. 



My dame has lost 

her shoe; 

My master lost his 

fiddle "stick. 
And knows not 

to 

do. 





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Polly, put tke 

kettle on, 
Polly, put the 
kettle on, 
Polly, put the 
kettle on. 


And let s drink 

tea. 



Sukey, take it 

off again, 
Sukey, take it 

off again, 
Sukey, take it 

off again. 
They've all gone 

away. 
























The vers es in this 
book, have been 
/z and-lettered by 

FREDWGOUDY 



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